Archive | Entrees

The Blue Plate Special: Autumn Comfort Food with Ruth Reichl

Ruth Reichl

6 years ago Ruth Reichl (It’s “RYE-shul,” not “RYE-Kul) had been the editor-in-chief of Gourmet magazine for 10 years.  Food magazines everywhere were succumbing to the onset of the Internet, but it never crossed her mind that Gourmet might shutter.  Until it did.

In conversation with Blue Plate Special hosts Kurt and Christine Friese, Reichl discusses the demise of Gourmet, how retreating to the kitchen was her salvation, and the book that resulted.  My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life is part journal, part cookbook, part collection of tweets that read like Haiku.  The great book designer Susan Turner used Reichl’s recipes and journal entries, along with the inviting photography of Mikkel Vang.

Afterwards, Kurt and Christine discuss their current go-to comfort foods for eating alone, like real ramen, and curry.  The book they refer to by Deborah Madison is called What We Eat When We Eat Alone, and you can get that here.

Follow Ms. Reichl on Twitter, and get her new book from your favorite local, independent bookseller by clicking here.



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The Kitchen Workshop: Preserving the Japanese Way with Nancy Singleton Hachisu

9781449450885On this episode of The Kitchen Workshop, Mary Reilly (the publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley) speaks with Nancy Singleton Hachisu, the author of Japanese Farm Food and the new book Preserving the Japanese Way.

Nancy and Mary talked about Japanese pickling and preserving. Nancy shared her method for making miso and discussed where to find good miso, if you’re not making your own.

Learn more about Nancy’s books and appearances at nancysingletonhachisu.com.

Find miso and and koji at South River Miso, and many Japanese ingredients at Gold Mine Natural Foods.

Nancy was kind enough to share her recipe for miso squid with us. Find it below.

Miso Squid – Ika No Misozuke

Serves 6

We are fortunate to have a constant supply of very fresh squid in Japan. If you have any doubts about the freshness of your squid, you might want to perform a boiling water–ice bath operation a couple of times by pouring a stream of boiling water over the squid for 10 seconds, then plunging in a bowl of ice water to refresh (yudoshi). Also squid is one sea creature that does not suffer much from freezing, so frozen squid is an alternative to fresh. Miso tends to burn, thus low-ember coals or far away from the broiler is best. Squid stands up to the miso and the long, slow cook more than fish, as its surface is naturally taut and becomes slightly caramelized. Utterly delectable as a before-dinner snack or appetizer. Also excellent cold the following day.

5 small fresh squid (about pound/150 g each)

½ teaspoon fine sea salt

1 tablespoon sake

4 tablespoons brown rice or barley miso

1 to 2 small dried red chiles, sliced into fine rings

Position a cutting board immediately to the left of the kitchen sink. Set the bag of squid directly behind the board and a wire-mesh strainer in the sink itself. Remove the squid from the bag and lay them on the board. Gently dislodge the inner gastric sacs from the bodies by running your finger around the perimeter of the inside body walls and pull the sac out in one piece. Reserve the sacs and some of the meat for making shiokara, if you like, otherwise, toss into the strainer for later composting. Stick your finger inside the body and pull out the plastic-like stick, called the gladius and set the bodies in the sink to wash.

Pat the squid bodies well with a clean dish towel. Drape across a dinner plate, and sprinkle all sides with the salt. Stash in the fridge for 1 to 2 hours uncovered.

Muddle the sake into the miso and spread over both surfaces of the squid bodies with a small rubber scraper; smooth around the tentacles (still attached at the top) with your fingers. Return the squid to the refrigerator for 2 or 3 hours more for a deep, dark taste. Grill slowly over low-ember coals or on a rack set in the third slot from the top of an oven broiler for about 5 minutes on each side. Julienne and eat as is for a before-dinner snack.

VARIATION: The laconic gentleman who hid behind dark glasses at the Wajima air-dried fish place parted with his favorite way to make squid: Marinate in soy sauce for 30 minutes and grill. Simple. I like to serve it with a squeeze of yuzu or Meyer lemon.

From Preserving the Japanese Way: Traditions of Salting, Fermenting, and Pickling for the Modern Kitchen, by Nancy Singleton Hachisu/Andrews McMeel Publishing, LLCRead the rest

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The Blue Plate Special: Celebrating Paula Wolfert with Emily Kaiser Thelin

Writer Emily Kaiser Thelin. Photo by Quentin Bacon

Emily Kaiser Thelin is a writer and editor based in Berkeley with a focus on food, drink, travel and design. A two-time finalist for James Beard awards, from 2006 to 2010 she was a food editor at Food & Wine. In 2007 she co-authored The Harney and Sons Guide to Teawith Michael Harney, published by Penguin Press. Her work has also appeared in the Best Food WritingseriesOprah, Dwell, Gourmet, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Timesand The Washington Post.

Now she is hard at work with her friend and mentor Paula Wolfert on their new Kickstarter-funded project: UNFORGETTABLE: Bold Flavors from a Renegade Life, a retrospective on Wolfert’s life and career in light of the onset of Alzheimers.

In this episode of The Blue Plate Special, hosts Kurt and Christine Friese talk to Thelin about Wolfert’s remarkable career and how the new project is coming together.

Click here to contribute the campaign, see their video and the recipes discussed in this episode.

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The Blue Plate Special: In the Prairie Kitchen with Summer Miller

Summer Miller Blogs at ScaldedMilk.com

Kurt & Christine chat with Summer Miller, author of New Prairie Kitchen, about the burgeoning cuisine of the Heartland.  Summer spent 4 years touring and tasting at farms and restaurants to find the best of this oft-neglected region, where the best soil on earth makes growing and eating local food easy.  Summer Miller blogs at ScaldedMilk.com.

There’s also a quick plug for the newest show int he Edible Radio lineup, Cuisine KaChing, and a mention of the forthcoming food writers conference, Eating Words.

The conference will be held October 2-4.  Make your plans now!  Tickets are available here, hotel arrangements here, travel info here, and the agenda is posted here.  You can follow updates via Facebook and Twitter.

Recipes below the fold…

 

 

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Kitchen Workshop: Twelve Recipes with Chef Cal Peternell of Chez Panisse

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Chef Cal Peternell. Photo by Ed Anderson

Kitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks to Cal Peternell about his book Twelve Recipes. Cal been a part of the team at Chez Panisse in Berkeley, California for nearly twenty years and is currently the chef of the downstairs restaurant.

His book embraces the idea that we should know how to cook a few things well. Then we can use those recipes as springboard for more creative thought. Twelve Recipes is written from a professional chef’s perspective, so experienced cooks will feel as if they have found a peer in its pages. But, it’s written from a father’s point of view as well; so a less-experienced cook will also find a comforting voice. Learn more about Cal Peternell at CalPeternell.com, and pick up a copy of Twelve Recipes at your favorite local bookseller!

Shop Indie Bookstores Recipes for Pesto and Leblebi  below the fold … Read the rest

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The Kitchen Workshop: More from Saveur’s India Issue with Kellie Evans

saveur__aambaIn this episode we continue our conversation on Saveur’s India issue, with Kellie Evans, an Associate Editor at Saveur. As the hunter, gatherer and writer of recipes for Saveur she gives us a behind-the-scenes look at how recipes are produced for each issue.

Visit the Saveur website to find the entire India Issue plus the stories that couldn’t fit into the magazine.

Recipes from this podcast:

Aamba Khatta (Sweet and Sour Mango Pickle)
Aloo Masala (South Indian Masala Potatoes)
Caramel Lassi
Ghanta Tarkari (Mixed Vegetable Coconut Curry)
Dosas
Palakoora Vepadu (Andhra-Style Sautéed Spinach)

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The Kitchen Workshop: Indian Wedding Food with Saveur’s Betsy Andrews

saveur__maacherWe spoke with Betsy Andrews, Acting Editor in Chief of Saveur Magazine, about Saveur’s India Issue. Join us on this podcast for a discussion of the culinary traditions of different regions of India. Betsy was a visitor at a wedding in Kashmir and tells us about the traditional wedding caterer (waza) and the 36-dish feast (wazwaan) he prepares. Enjoy the flavors of a Kashmiri wedding with Mirchi Qorma (Kashmiri Lamb in Chile Sauce).

She also takes us to the Kashmiri city of Srinagar and together we visit its marvelous floating gardens and boat markets.

Visit the Saveur website to find the entire India Issue plus the stories that couldn’t fit into the magazine.

Recipes from this podcast:
Maacher Johl (Bengali-Style Fish Stew)
Mirchi Qorma (Kashmiri Lamb in Chile Sauce)
Sevaya Kheer (Vermicelli Milk Pudding)
Shahi Tukra (Royal Toast)
Smita Chandra’s Rasam (Spicy Tamarind Soup)

On this episode, Betsy Andrews of Saveur Magazine describes her visit to the Kashmir region of India. As we recorded, in early September 2014, news reports describing the worst monsoon flooding and landslides in 100 years started to come out of the region. As of September 17, the current death toll from the floods in Indian Kashmir is estimated at over 200, and tens of thousands of residents are homeless. Our thoughts go out to the victims of the disaster.

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