Archive | Edible Authors

The Blue Plate Special: Autumn Comfort Food with Ruth Reichl

Ruth Reichl

6 years ago Ruth Reichl (It’s “RYE-shul,” not “RYE-Kul) had been the editor-in-chief of Gourmet magazine for 10 years.  Food magazines everywhere were succumbing to the onset of the Internet, but it never crossed her mind that Gourmet might shutter.  Until it did.

In conversation with Blue Plate Special hosts Kurt and Christine Friese, Reichl discusses the demise of Gourmet, how retreating to the kitchen was her salvation, and the book that resulted.  My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life is part journal, part cookbook, part collection of tweets that read like Haiku.  The great book designer Susan Turner used Reichl’s recipes and journal entries, along with the inviting photography of Mikkel Vang.

Afterwards, Kurt and Christine discuss their current go-to comfort foods for eating alone, like real ramen, and curry.  The book they refer to by Deborah Madison is called What We Eat When We Eat Alone, and you can get that here.

Follow Ms. Reichl on Twitter, and get her new book from your favorite local, independent bookseller by clicking here.



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Blue Plate Special: Stalking the Elusive Pawpaw, with Andrew Moore

In this edition of The Blue Plate Special, Kurt and Christine visit with Andrew Moore, author of Pawpaw: In Search of America’s Forgotten Fruit, just released by Chelsea Green.  Andrew discusses the elusive treats origins, flavors, uses, and why you should never eat the seeds.  Following that discussion, Kurt gives Christine a primer on knife basics – bare essentials, selection, care and use.


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Episode 29: Woody Tasch

Edible Radio host and publisher of Edible Santa Fe, Kate Manchester, talks to Woody Tasch about the Slow Money Alliance.

Founded by Woody Tasch, a pioneer in merging investing and philanthropy, Slow Money’s mission is to build local and national networks, and develop new financial products and services. Slow Money is dedicated to investing in small food enterprises, local food systems, connecting investors to their local economies, and building the nurture capital industry. Woody is also the author of Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money

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Episode 20: Shannon Hayes

Edible Radio host and publisher of Edible Santa Fe, Kate Manchester, talks to Shannon Hayes.

Shannon Hayes latest book is Radical Homemakers. Armed with a keen palate, a farm background, an eye for the absurd and a hearty appetite, Shannon is on a mission to convince the world that we can save the planet, one bite at a time. She holds a BA in creative writing from Binghamton University, and a masters and Ph.D. in sustainable agriculture and community development from Cornell University. Shannon lives with her husband Bob Hooper and their daughters Saoirse and Ula in Schoharie County, New York where they work with her parents, Jim and Adele Hayes, on Sap Bush Hollow Farm . The family raises all-natural grassfed lamb, beef, pork, and poultry. Shannon is the author of The Farmer and the Grill and The Grassfed Gourmet Cookbook. Visit Shannon at www.shannonhayes.info and www.grassfedcooking.com.

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Episode 19: Michael Shuman

Edible Radio host and publisher of Edible Santa Fe, Kate Manchester, talks to Michael Shuman.

Michael Schuman is the author of The Small Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition (Berrett-Koehler, 2006) and is the BALLE (Business Alliance for Local, Living Economies) research and public policy director. He holds an A.B. with distinction in economics and international relations from Stanford University and a J.D. from Stanford Law School. An economist, attorney, author, and entrepreneur, Michael has authored, coauthored, or edited seven books, including Going Local: Creating Self-Reliant Communities in the Global Age (Free Press, 1998). The Small-Mart Revolution was awarded a bronze medal for best business book by the Independent Publishers’ Association. In recent years, Michael has led community-based economic-development efforts in St. Lawrence County (NY), Hudson Valley (NY), Katahdin Region (ME), Martha’s Vineyard (MA), and Carbondale (CO), and served as a senior editor for the recently published Encyclopedia of Community. You can read more from Michael at http://small-mart.org/.

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Episode 12: Gordon Edgar

Edible Radio’s Kate Manchester talks to Gordon Edgar, the cheesemonger at San Francisco’s Rainbow Grocery Cooperative whose first book has just been published.

Cheesemonger: A Life on the Wedge, is the story of Edgar, a former volunteer at Epicenter Zone, the not-for-profit punk community center in the Mission district, who lucks his way into the cheese buyer position at Rainbow Grocery. Taking over a cheese counter full of industrial jacks, cheddars and bries, he slowly transforms a once-pedestrian assortment into a world-class fromagerie.

Under the premise that punk rock made him a cheesemonger, the book is a lively inside look at the world of not-so-honest cheese pushers and sales reps, including the time he throws a pretentious New York cheese importer out of Rainbow Grocery with a Cali-inspired “Dude, shut up and get the !@#$ out of our store.”

More travelog than cheese review, he travels to regional dairies for an intimate look at the artisan cheese movement. At one farm he’s excited to see cows eating their way through spring grasses, and bemoans the fact that seasonal cheeses are a dying breed, a victim of large-scale production and international free trade.

But back at the store, more customers are demanding to know where animals “grazed” before making a selection (thanks to books like The Omnivore’s Dilemma), and Edgar strives to feature dairy farmers who can supply real numbers (forage vs. feedlot) when they use the terms pasture-based or grass-fed.

Unfortunately the USDA has no standardized definition of foraging and he predicts that the term will ultimately be meaningless, citing the cynical dairy in-joke regarding access to pasture: “Yeah, they walk ’em through the field on the way to the slaughterhouse.” Or as Alice Beetz, program specialist from the National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service, says: “Think of milk as a means of marketing the forage.”

In later chapters, Edgar dips into “The Milk of Human Neurosis” and sharpens his activist edge with a look a “Punk Subculture and Reagan Cheese.” In “Terroir, Trucking, and Knowing Your Place,” he ponders the American Cheese Society’s use of the term terroir, slyly noting that the United States has no real land-based tradition, especially considering that our biggest contribution to the world of dairy is American Cheese.

Each chapter of Life on the Wedge ends with a couple of cheese profiles, which are more like in-depth bios than serious tasting notes, but the real attraction to this book is that Edgar takes no prisoners in his search for the truth in cheese and we all eat better for it.

Check out Gordon’s blog, www.gordonzola.net and his book is published by Chelsea Green.

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Episode 9: Elissa Altman

Elissa Altman is an award-winning columnist, humorist, and commentator on all things culinary. Once described as the illegitimate love child of David Sedaris and M.F.K. Fisher, Altman has contributed to Saveur Magazine, the Hartford Courant, Beard House Magazine, the New York Times, and blogs regularly for the Huffington Post.  Formerly a restaurant critic for The Hartford Courant, Ms. Altman has also worked in New York City as a personal chef and caterer, attended the Institute for Culinary Education, and was a longtime senior editor at both HarperCollins and Clarkson Potter. 

She is the founder of the very funny and delicous blog, PoorMansFeast.com, and you can follow her on Twitter  @PoorMansFeast.

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Episode 3: Terry Walters

 

Program Notes:

Terry Walters, author of CLEAN FOOD: A Seasonal Guide to Eating Close to the Source.

More than a cookbook, CLEAN FOOD is an encouraging, easy-to-understand guide to eating closer to the source and benefiting from the rich nutritional profile of the best and freshest locally grown ingredients. Terry Walters provides valuable information on how to nourish yourself with nutrient-rich foods in a rainbow of colors and a full spectrum of tastes. Terry’s book empowers you to make changes, big and small, in how you shop for and prepare food so that you can make a big difference in the way you eat and feel. Walters begins with an extensive introduction to the world of CLEAN FOOD where you’ll learn about whole grains, vegetables, legumes, soy, nuts, seeds, sea vegetables, and fruit. You’ll also appreciate information on organic versus conventional foods and other considerations that can help you serve your unique constitution — one healthy choice at a time. The recipes, which are organized by season and include several dishes that are perfect any time of year, prove that clean food is delicious food. For more information, visit Terry at www.terrywalters.net

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